Whether you’re a victim of sexual assault or being accused, there is help at UCF.

UCF is dedicated to making sure students have the information and resources needed to get the help they deserve. If you have been involved in a sexual harassment or assault incident please learn what steps to take, how to report, and where to obtain support on campus.

What is sexual assault?

Sexual assault is any form of sexual activity where consent is not willingly given. It includes anything from touching to penetration. Males and females can be both victims and perpetrators of sexual assault.

Consent is intelligent, knowing, and voluntary, and does not include coerced submission. Failure by the victim to offer physical resistance to the offender does not mean consent was given. A person may not be able to consent if under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Sexual assault is a traumatic event, and victims commonly experience fear, shock, confusion, disbelief, embarrassment, shame, guilt, and a tremendous sense of loss.

Sexual assault is an extreme form of sexual misconduct and is prohibited by Title IX. However, less severe forms of sexual misconduct are also prohibited by Title IX.

What should victims do first?

The single most important step a victim of sexual assault may take is to tell someone and get help, which could include talking with a family member, friend, partner, advocate, counselor, healthcare provider, or law enforcement officer. For more information, click here.

Learn how to help a friend who’s been sexually assaulted.

The victim should also try to preserve evidence of the assault especially during the first 96 hours after the assault for possible investigation. See our Evidence Preservation document for advice.


Types of Complaints

Formal Complaints

Bringing a formal complaint will lead to an investigation and can result in disciplinary action. Disciplinary action against students found in violation occurs after a hearing conducted by the Office of Student Conduct. Disciplinary action against faculty and staff occurs after an investigation, but without a hearing. Filing a complaint is often the best way to seek protection from future harm. To better understand the complaint process contact the Title IX coordinator or Office of Student Conduct.

Informal Remedies

Informal remedies do not replace discipline and can be taken before or during an investigation. Examples include: issuing an administrative no-contact order, change in classes, change in housing, change in transportation or working situations, or asking an administrative authority to speak to the individual to express concerns about a behavior.  The UCF disciplinary process does not include communications and meetings between officials and victims concerning accomodations or protective measures to be provided to the victim.


Confidentiality

Privileged and confidential conversations with professional, licensed counselors, pastoral counselors and health care providers are confidential and, except in rare or extreme circumstances, no information will be shared without your explicit permission.

Privileged and confidential conversations with UCF Victim Services staff members are kept confidential, but information about the nature, date, time, and general location of the incident of sexual misconduct, BUT NOT THE IDENTITY OF THE VICTIM, must be shared with relevant administrators. Information is shared with the Title IX coordinator and deputy Title IX coordinator, and in some cases law enforcement, so that action can be taken for reasons of safety. In planning any response, the wishes of the person reporting are given full consideration.

Confidential conversations with the Title IX coordinator and deputy Title IX coordinator must maintain confidentially at the victim’s request with some exceptions. The Title IX coordinator and deputy Title IX coordinator must weigh the confidentiality request against other factors including whether the victim is a minor, the seriousness of the conduct, and the increased risk that the alleged perpetrator will commit additional acts of violence against the victim or others. The Title IX coordinator and deputy Title IX coordinator is responsible for ensuring that allegations of sexual misconduct are investigated and that findings of sexual misconduct are addressed. If a victim insists that her or his identity is kept confidential, a full investigation and disciplinary action may not be possible.

Employees, called Responsible Employees are required to report all details of an incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX coordinator. A report to a Responsible Employee is considered a report to the university. The Title IX coordinator will consider the victim’s request for confidentiality as described above.

Confidentiality according to state law allows for conversations with the police to remain confidential. Police reports with personally identifiable information removed may be available to the public upon request.

FERPA Protected This term means that information protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) will not be released without the student’s permission. The outcome of any institutional disciplinary hearing, as a result of an allegation of a sexual offense, must be provided to both the accuser and the accused. Release of this information does not violate FERPA and is required by the Clery Act. Click here for more information.

For a Summary of U.S. State Laws Related to Advocate Confidentiality please click here.

Click here for a list of support centers


Where to report or obtain support on campus.

There are several places on campus for victims to receive assistance, support, and report incidents of sexual assault. It is important for the victim to understand the different functions and services each office provides in order to make an informed decision suitable to her or his situation and the different levels of confidentiality.

Seeking info & support Obtaining Counseling Informal Remedies
Info
Formal Complaints
Info
Confidentiality Levels
UCF Victim Services
24/7 Advocacy & Support: 407-823-1200
Yes Yes Yes Privileged & Confidential
Info
UCF Police Department
Emergencies: 911
Non-Emergencies: 407-823-5555
*Action Office
Yes Confidential according to state law
Info
Title IX Coordinator
407-823-1336
*Action Office
Yes Yes Yes Confidential
Info
Deputy Title IX Coordinator (SDES)
407-823-4638
*Action Office
Yes Yes Yes Confidential
Info
Office of Student Conduct
407-823-4638
*Action Office
Yes Yes FERPA-Protected
Info
UCF Counseling and Psychological Services
407-823-2811
Yes Yes Privileged & Confidential
Info
UCF Student Health Services
407-823-2701
Yes Privileged & Confidential
Info

What happens after I make a report?

The Investigation Process

Title IX Coordinator, Equal Opportunity & Affirmative Action Office

The director of Equal Opportunity & Affirmative Action serves as the university’s Title IX coordinator and is responsible for investigating allegations of sexual harassment and sexual violence perpetrated by faculty, staff or other non-students against faculty, staff or student victims. Allegations may be investigated informally or through the university Formal Discrimination Grievance process. Click here for details on that process. Questions about the process should be directed to a staff member at 407-823-1336 or visit their website.

Office of Student Conduct

If the perpetrator is a student, an incident report may be filed with the deputy Title IX Coordinator or with the Office of Student Conduct via an online incident reporting form which is available on the office’s website.  The deputy Title IX coordinator is responsible for investigating allegations of sexual harassment and sexual violence perpetrated by students against students, faculty or staff. The UCF Golden Rule Student Handbook provides more detailed information of options, resources, and assistance available through the university’s student conduct review process for students who are victims of sexual misconduct committed by another student or student organization. Questions about the process should be directed to a staff member at 407-823-4638, or visit their website.

UCF Police Department

A police investigation is separate from an investigation that the Title IX coordinator or deputy Title IX coordinator performs. A police investigation may result in prosecution and criminal penalties through the court system.


Knowing your rights.

Victims

Sexual misconduct is not tolerated at UCF. Reports of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking are taken seriously. It is important to UCF that victims are informed, protected, and respected. The following rights are afforded to any UCF student, staff, or faculty member who experiences sexual misconduct.

For additional information, click here.

The Accused

If you have been accused of sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking, and the university is determining whether disciplinary action is appropriate, you have certain rights.

For additional information, click here.